NOW HIRING

The Town of Sunburst is seeking applications for the position of Clerk/Treasurer. It is a full-time position. Hours of 8:00-4:30 (negotiable). Wages will depend on experience, includes benefits as well as participation in the state PERS retirement program. Please apply at city hall or mail application/resume to Town of Sunburst Po Box 245 Sunburst MT 59482. If there are any questions please contact city hall at (406) 937-2141 between 7:30-4:00pm.

Position open until filled.

Welcome All Class Reunion Participants!!

June 27, 2016 – On behalf of the Sunburst Town Council, I would like to welcome all class reunion participants. While you are in Town, I encourage you to check out Engle Park and the Lions Memorial Pool. We appreciate the hard work of the reunion committee and other groups that have made this occasion a success.

Mayor Gary Iverson

CCR NOW AVAILABLE!

The 2015 Consumer Confidence Report

CCR2016

The 2014 Consumer Confidence Report for the Town of Sunburst Water System is now available.

TOWN OF SUNBURST

Montana Public Water Supply ID number 00338

2014 Water Quality Report

 

In compliance with the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Act and in an effort to keep you informed about the quality of water and services we provide to you each day, we’re pleased to provide you with our Annual Water Quality Report.  This report is a snapshot of the quality of water we provided you last year.  It includes details regarding the source of your water, what your water contains and how it compares to EPA and the State of Montana standards.

 

Our drinking water comes from two wells. The soft water well is 475’ deep and the hard water well is 159’ deep.  In order to maintain its purity, we treat our water with a small amount of chlorine.  We have 202 service connections and added one new connection last year.  In a continuing effort to maintain and improve our system, we replaced our well pumps and pipes last year.

 

We are pleased to report that our drinking water is safe and meets all federal and state requirements.  If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Linda Burley at (406) 937-2141.  Dan Kolve was our certified operator.  He attended periodic training sessions to meet continuing education requirements.  The most recent training course he attended was in February of 2014 and the topics included fire hydrants, valves, and safety.

 

DID YOU KNOW?  The sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, and wells.  As water travels over the surface of land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and in some cases radioactive elements.  Water can also pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

 

Contaminants that may be present in water include:

1)                  Microbial contaminants such as viruses and bacteria which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife.

2)                  Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic waste water discharges, oil and gas production, mining and farming.

3)                  Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.

4)                  Volatile organic chemicals, which are byproducts of industrial processes, petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.

5)                  Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

 

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.  FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.  We take all of our water samples to Montana Environmental Laboratory in Kalispell (406-755-2131).  They are a private laboratory that is certified by the State of Montana and the EPA to analyze drinking water.  The following tests were performed to identify possible contaminants in our system during the period of January 1 to December 31, 2014:

  • 11 coliform bacteria tests – all were coliform free.
  • 1 Nitrate plus Nitrite test – result was within EPA guidelines.

 

Due to the purity of our water, we have applied for and been issued a monitoring waiver for 10 inorganic contaminants.  This waiver allows our system to sample only once every nine years for these contaminants.  Past sampling has shown that these contaminants are either not present in our water or occur in such small amounts that they do not warrant a health hazard.  This waiver covers the period from 2011 to 2019.

 

The following table lists the contaminants detected during recent testing.  Some of the data in this table may be more than one year old, since certain chemical contaminants are monitored less than once per year.

Regulated Contaminants

CONTAMINANT

VIOLATION

Y/N

SAMPLE DATE

HIGHEST LEVEL DETECTED

UNIT MEASURE-MENT

MCLG

MCL

LIKELY SOURCE OF   CONTAMINATION

Alpha Emitters

N

7-30-13

3.6 +/- 3.0

pCi/L

0

15

Erosion of natural deposits

Arsenic

N

7-30-13

4

ppb

10

10

Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from orchards, Runoff   from glass and electronics production wastes

Barium

N

9-27-11

0.017

ppm

2

2

Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal   refineries; erosion of natural deposits

Copper

N

7-10-13

90th % is 0.02

ppm

1.3

AL=

1.3

Corrosion of Household plumbing / naturally occurring

Fluoride

N

9-27-11

1.13

ppm

4

4

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which   promotes strong teeth: Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories

Nitrate

N

1-22-14

0.50

ppm

10

10

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic   tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits

Radium 226

N

7-30-13

0.2 +/- 0.1

pCi/L

0

5

Natural deposits

Selenium

N

9-27-11

2

ppb

50

50

Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries;   Erosion of natural deposits; Discharge from mines.

Uranium

N

7-30-13

2

ppb

0

30

Erosion of natural deposits

 

DEFINITIONS:

MCL – Maximum Contaminant Level – The “Maximum Allowed” is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

MCLG – Maximum Contaminant Level Goal - The “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

PPM – Parts per million or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) – one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.

PPB – Parts per billion or Micrograms per liter – one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.

AL – Action Level - the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Pci/L – Pico Curies per Liter – a very small unit of measurement of radioactivity.

 

What does this table tell us?

As you can see our system had no MCL violations.  MCL’s are set at very stringent levels.  To understand the possible health effects of exceeding the MCL, a person would have to drink two liters of water every day at the MCL for a lifetime to have a one in a million chance of having any adverse health effects.  Although we have learned through our monitoring and testing that some constituents have been detected, the EPA has determined that your water IS SAFE at these levels.

 

We are required to monitor your drinking water for specific contaminants on a regular basis.  Results of regular monitoring are an indicator of whether or not our drinking water meets health standards.  We are required to test for coliform bacteria once each month.  Due to administrative oversight we did not sample for coliform bacteria during the month of May, 2014.  Therefore we cannot be sure of the quality of our drinking water during that time.  We were notified of this and received a failure to monitor violation letter from the Montana Department of Environmental Quality in June of 2014.  All of our coliform bacteria samples in 2014 were coliform free.

 

To ensure its purity, we disinfect our water with chlorine.  The Montana Department of Environmental Quality (MTDEQ) requires we record the level of chlorine daily.  Every month we are required to submit a copy of the daily chlorine log to MTDEQ.  Due to an administrative oversight we did not submit our chlorine log to MTDEQ for October, November or December of 2014.  We received a failure to monitor violation for these months.  We submitted our logs to MTDEQ and the violations have been lifted.  We are taking steps to ensure that the chlorine level is recorded daily and the report is submitted to MTDEQ by the 10th of each month to avoid further violations.

 

All sources of drinking water are subject to potential contamination by contaminants that are naturally occurring or man made.  Those contaminants can be microbes, organic or inorganic chemicals, or radioactive materials.  All drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791, or online at

 

Lead in drinking water comes primarily from materials and components of the service lines and home plumbing systems.  It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home’s plumbing.  Our water system is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but we cannot control the variety of materials used in private home plumbing systems.  If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children.  If you are concerned about elevated lead levels in your home’s water, you may wish to have your water tested by a certified laboratory like the one we send our samples to (Montana Environmental Laboratory, 406-755-2131).  When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap until the water temperature has stabilized (usually for 30 seconds to 2 minutes) before you use the water for drinking or cooking.  Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure to lead is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline 1-800-426-4791, or online at .

 

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline, or online at

 

In October of 2003, the Montana Department of Environmental Quality conducted a source water assessment of our system.  This report provides additional information on the potential vulnerability of our wells to contamination.  This report is available for review online at http://mslapps.mt.gov/Geographic_Information/Data/SourceWaterProtectionProgram/.

The report can be summarized in the table on the following page.

 

Our water system is committed to providing our customers with safe, pure water and we are pleased that our water meets or exceeds all established state and federal standards.  Thank you for reviewing this report.

Prepared by Montana Environmental Lab, LLC 2/15

 


Significant Potential Contaminant Sources

Source Potential Contaminant Hazard Hazard Rating Barriers Susceptibility Management   Recommendations
Control and Inventory Zone
Agricultural Land Use   (<20% of Inventory Region) SOCs, nitrates, pathogens Contaminants leaching into   groundwater Low

 

 

LowHard Water Well

- Clay-rich surface soils

 

Soft Water Well

- Clay-rich surface soils

- Aquifer depth >100 ftVery Low   Susceptibility

 

Very Low   SusceptibilityEncourage use of best   management practices (BMPs)Old water wellsTotal dissolved solids, sulfur,   petroleum productsOld wells may act as a   conduit for poor-quality shallow groundwater to enter deeper Virgelle   Sandstone drinking water.High

 

 

ModerateHard Water Well

None

 

Soft Water Well

- New construction with   adequate casing seal

- Well 15 properly abandoned

- R. Swanson well is   hydraulically downgradientVery High   Susceptibility

 

Low   SusceptibilityContinue efforts to assess   all old wells, remove petroleum products (if present), and properly abandon   or renovate failing wells.Oil and Gas Well(s)Total dissolved solids,   petroleum hydrocarbonsImproperly sealed or   abandoned wells may facilitate contaminant transport to shallow or deeper   aquifers.Not Applicable

 

 

 

ModerateHard Water Well

- None identified within the   Inventory Region for the Hard Water Well

 

Soft Water Well

- Clay rich surface soils

- Aquifer depth >100 ftNot Applicable

 

 

 

 

 Low SusceptibilityEncourage monitoring of   drilling activities and oil field development.Potential Sources located in Recharge AreaAgricultural Land Use (28%   of Recharge Region)SOCs, nitrates, pathogensContaminants leaching into   groundwaterModerate to Low- Clay-rich surface soilsNot Rated – outside the   Inventory RegionEncourage use of best   management practices (BMPs)Oil and Gas Wells and Test   HolesTotal dissolved solids,   petroleum hydrocarbonsImproperly sealed or   abandoned wells may facilitate contaminant transport to shallow or deeper   aquifers.High to Moderate- Clay-rich surface soilsNot Rated – outside the   Inventory RegionEncourage monitoring of   drilling activities and oil field development near or adjacent the Recharge   RegionPetroleum PipelinesPetroleum hydrocarbonsSpills, leaks, and releases   may impact groundwaterHigh to Moderate for the New   Soft Water Well only- Leak detection

- Emergency response

- Clay-rich surface soils

- Aquifer depth >100 ft.Not Rated – outside the   Inventory RegionSupport the county’s effort   to maintain preparedness of local emergency personnel through active training.  Encourage groundwater monitoring, spill   prevention, BMPs, and ongoing remediation of soil or groundwater at leak   sites.Other Water WellsTotal dissolved solids,   sulfur, petroleum productsOld wells may provide a   direct conduit for poor quality shallow groundwater to enter deeper   groundwater / drinking water source.High to ModerateNoneNot Rated – outside the   Inventory RegionEducate public on proper   maintenance and replacement of on-site systems; promote advanced treatment   systems; annex into community sewer system.

Notes on Susceptibility Determination table:

  • Town of Sunburst PWS wells are assumed to be drawing      water from a confined aquifer and the Hard Water Well is not clearly      sealed into or through the confining unit above the confined aquifer      because the lithologic log does not indicate sealing occurred.  It is a conservative assumption that the      Hard Water Well is not sealed, which increases the hazard of contaminant      source within the Inventory Region for this well.
  • BMPs – Best Management Practices
  • VOCs – Volatile organic Compounds (i.e. solvents,      fuel components)
  • SOCs – Synthetic Organic Compounds (i.e. pesticides,      herbicides, plasticizers)

 

SPRING HAS SPRUNG!

As you do your spring cleaning and yard work, please remember to dispose of your old furniture, tree trimmings and other debris appropriately.  Large items can be picked up by the Town for a minimal fee.  Please do not dump these items on Town property.  Our crew is very busy this time of year and does not have the time to clean up debris left on our property.  This type of activity is also very costly to the Town.

Your monthly landfill payment gives you access to the Shelby Landfill.  If you have questions about what you can bring and when you can use the landfill, you can call 406-434-5564.

Thanks for your cooperation.

Dumpster Full?

If the dumpster you normally use is full, please use another dumpster around town.  DO NOT lay garbage next to the dumpster or fill it so the lid will not close.  You are allowed to use any dumpster so there should never be any garbage lying next to dumpsters.

Inaugural Newsletter

Welcome to the Town of Sunburst Online Newsletter!  Our Town newsletter will now be online and will be updated from time to time as new things arise. Older articles will be saved so if you don’t read the newsletter frequently, you won’t miss out.

Garbage Collection
We want to remind everyone that there are some exceptions to things you can place in our dumpsters. The garbage is compacted in the truck and there are some items that can damage the compacting device. Repairing the truck is very expensive and while it is being repaired we are forced to rent Shelby’s truck to collect garbage. T his has happened more than once in the past year so please put only allowed items in the dumpsters. Any large items that you would like disposed of can be picked up by the Town and brought to the dump for you at a cost of $20 per item. To make arrangements for a pickup, call City Hall @ 937-2141.
Items that are NOT allowed in the dumpsters are:
• Appliances
• Anything with Freon in it
• Tires
• Any metals that are harder than a coffee can
• Rocks & Dirt
• Batteries (small household batteries are okay)
• Chemicals
• Furniture
• Mattresses

If you need to put tree limbs and branches in the dumpster, make sure that they are cut into smaller pieces to fit into the dumpster with the lid closed.
Please do not put things beside the dumpsters. If the dumpster you normally use is full, feel free to use another dumpster around town.

We Want Your Opinion!

We receive complaints very frequently about drivers making U-Turns on First Street North between intersections. This happens very frequently when people drive into town from the east and make a U-Turn to park in front of the store, Post Office and bank. Many have complained that they were nearly hit by drivers parking this way. Others are concerned that backing out across both lanes is unsafe. The issue seems to be a problem that many people are very concerned about.
We brought your concerns to the Toole County Sheriff’s Department and were told that it’s not against any state law to make a U-Turn in the street unless the vehicle does a complete 180o turn. When making a U-Turn to park on the other side of the street the turn is not a full 180o so it is not illegal.

Your complaints have been relayed to the Council and it was discussed at a recent Council Meeting. At that time, Council discussed creating an ordinance to prohibit making these U-Turns between intersections. This would make it illegal and tickets could then be written to those who violate the new law. In discussing this possibility, the Council felt that it was important to find out how the majority of people in Sunburst feel about this issue and the possibility of an Ordinance banning such U-Turns. Would you be in favor of an Ordinance to end U-Turns between intersections? If so, do you want it to be specific to 1st Street North, or include all streets in Sunburst?

Please check one of the boxes below and feel free to include your comments on this issue. If there are enough people interested in the creation of such an Ordinance, the Council will then revisit the subject at a future meeting. Your Town Council is very interested in your opinion. Responses will be taken into account when deciding whether or not to address this issue.

U-Turns Ban
Would you be in favor of an Ordinance to end U-Turns between intersections?
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Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow…

Winter is coming soon and along with it comes snow. It is forecasted that we will have a lot of snow this winter. We’ve already had our first snowfalls for the year and as the season continues we want to remind everyone of our snow policy.

“The Town of Sunburst tries to move a minimum amount of snow while providing access to all streets for all residents. The reason for minimum plowing is snow piles and snow ridges collect a lot more snow than level areas. We do not plow while it is blowing. We go out after the wind has died down, as you may have seen our plow out late at night and on weekends. If you have a specific problem, please call City Hall or Mayor Iverson. If we don’t get relief we will have to hire help to remove snow piles. Alleys are only plowed as needed for garbage pickup. Snow is not to be piled on the streets by residents or businesses. When removing snow from driveways, residents are also asked to pile snow somewhere other than the street.”

Residents who plow snow are being asked not to pile the snow in the streets. We have experienced snow piled in front of businesses and also where trucks park when filling tank water. These piles must be removed and the city crew does not have the extra time to move this snow.